Today is July 16, 2019

Verse of the Day — Deuteronomy 23:3

No Ammonite or Moabite shall enter the assembly of the LORD . .  . even to the tenth generation.


THOUGHT FOR THE DAY

There are consequences to sin.


MINI BIBLE STUDY FOR THE DAY

In the Old Testament, the Jewish people paid a dear penalty if they married a Moabite or Ammonite—they were excluded from temple worship for ten generations. The reason—the Moabites and the Ammonites were descendants of Lot’s daughters’ illegitimate children (fathered by Lot himself, Genesis 19:31-37). This was clearly against Old Testament law.

None of you shall approach any blood relative of his to uncover nakedness; I am the LORD. —Leviticus 18:6

The sin of this incestuous relationship caused problems for a lot (no pun intended) of grandchildren.

Our fathers sinned, and are no more;
It is we who have borne their iniquities.
—Lamentations 5:7

. . . visiting the iniquity of the fathers on the children, and on the third and the fourth generations . . . —Deuteronomy 5:9

For those living in the Church Age, God warns us of the dangers of sin, that He is “not mocked” and “whatever a man sows, this he will also reap” (Galatians 6:7).

So, if for no other reason, think of your future testimony before you throw caution to the wind.


QUESTION FOR THE DAY

Dear Compass,

I have a problem. My soon-to-be ex-husband, who is not a Christian and has filed for the divorce, now has rights to visit our 3-month-old son. When I first became pregnant, he told me that he did not want the child and that he was not ready to be a father. Now he comes to visit and spends the whole time waking the baby up and letting him scream until he is hysterical. He finds this funny and has no cause for concern about his own son’s well-being.

He was an abusive husband, and I fear he will be an abusive father. Unfortunately, the law says he has rights to his child even if he’s a bad person. I have been praying for God to somehow take this wicked man out of our child’s life. I’m pretty confident that he is not a Christian as he mocked me when I went to church or prayed.

Now I am worried that I may have angered God by asking him to take such a person away from his own child. I can forgive him for the abuse he’s done to me, but I find it hard to forgive him for the abuse he inflicts on our child. How can I pray the right way?


ANSWER:

THE most important concern in this situation is the salvation of two individuals—your husband and your child. Second on the list is the reconciliation of your marriage and the restoration of a normal mother/father/son relationship for your family.

(but if she does leave, she must remain unmarried, or else be reconciled to her husband), and that the husband should not divorce his wife. —1 Corinthians 7:11

Therefore, you should pray for your husband’s salvation. God wants you to allow for Christ to be seen in your life—not just in words, but in deeds and respect:

. .&nbsp. wives, be submissive to your own husbands so that even if any of them are disobedient to the word, they may be won without a word by the behavior of their wives. —1 Peter 3:1

. . . the wife must see to it that she respects her husband. —Ephesians 5:33

Regarding your fear-centered prayer for your husband, fortunately God is compassionate and understanding. But you may have allowed a “root of bitterness” (Hebrews 12:15) to develop between you and your husband.

You should arrange to spend some quiet time with God and ask Him to reveal to you ANY sin involving your husband so you can repent and move on so it won’t become a stumbling block in the future.

Unless you feel that your husband is truly abusing your child, confirmed by two or three Godly people, then you must, by law, continue to allow the visits. A Godly appeal is, of course, always an option. Never forget that this man is your son’s father and can be used wonderfully by God in his life. And your son needs a father’s influence, Christian or non-Christian.

Whether your son is with you or your ex-husband, you should pray daily for your child’s protection. But always remember, God is fully in control and loves your son more than you do.

Finally, you are to forgive your husband fully, as Jesus has forgiven you, realizing that, except for the grace of God, you could be in his shoes.

Be kind to one another, tender-hearted, forgiving each other, just as God in Christ also has forgiven you. —Ephesians 4:32

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Scripture taken from the New American Standard Bible, copyright The Lockman Foundation 1960, 1962, 1963, 1968, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977. Used by permission.

Answers to questions in GML are intended to be supplementary and in the spirit of Proverbs 11:14, 15:22, and 26:26, which calls for believers to seek counsel from more than one person. Therefore, it is not recommended that any decision be based solely on GML’s answer, but rather it be considered one of several counselors when determining a course of action.

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